Surprised?
Published on January 6, 2011 By KFC Kickin For Christ In Current Events

I remember debating this subject some time back and getting into quite a heated debate about it with a running club member.  One of the members of my club posted a public comment on our forum urging parents NOT to vaccinate their children.  Of course I had to step in and give my two cents worth at the time.  Now with this latest news I do feel vindicated.  Of course, now I've moved and am not a member of that club anymore. 

Some people were insisting back then that vaccines could cause autism when, in fact, it wasn't that clear cut.  Their "research" was very sketchy.  Some of the people behind the debate, pushing the contention, were not even legitimate physicans or medical researchers.  I remember one of the most vocal guys behind this, his name escapes me now, even had his medical license suspended for an unrelated reason. 

 Just goes to show that the truth will eventually come out even if it takes a while to do so.   Here's the latest: 

The first study to link a childhood vaccine to autism was based on doctored information about the children involved, according to a new report on the widely discredited research.

The conclusions of the 1998 paper by Andrew Wakefield and colleagues was renounced by 10 of its 13 authors and later retracted by the medical journal Lancet, where it was published. Still, the suggestion the MMR shot was connected to autism spooked parents worldwide and immunization rates for measles, mumps and rubella have never fully recovered.

A new examination found, by comparing the reported diagnoses in the paper to hospital records, that Wakefield and colleagues altered facts about patients in their study.

The analysis, by British journalist Brian Deer, found that despite the claim in Wakefield's paper that the 12 children studied were normal until they had the MMR shot, five had previously documented developmental problems. Deer also found that all the cases were somehow misrepresented when he compared data from medical records and the children's parents.

Wakefield could not be reached for comment despite repeated calls and requests to the publisher of his recent book, which claims there is a connection between vaccines and autism that has been ignored by the medical establishment. Wakefield now lives in the U.S. where he enjoys a vocal following including celebrity supporters like Jenny McCarthy.

Deer's article was paid for by the Sunday Times of London and Britain's Channel 4 television network. It was published online Thursday in the medical journal, BMJ.

In an accompanying editorial, BMJ editor Fiona Godlee and colleagues called Wakefield's study "an elaborate fraud." They said Wakefield's work in other journals should be examined to see if it should be retracted.

Last May, Wakefield was stripped of his right to practice medicine in Britain. Many other published studies have shown no connection between the MMR vaccination and autism.

But measles has surged since Wakefield's paper was published and there are sporadic outbreaks in Europe and the U.S. In 2008, measles was deemed endemic in England and Wales.

 


Comments (Page 4)
on Feb 05, 2011

EPA Administrator Claims Regulating Drinking Water Supply Prevents Kids from Getting Autism

If it keeps up, the EPA is going to be America's downfall.

 

 

on Feb 05, 2011

If it keeps up, the EPA is going to be America's downfall.

ya, they're well on their way..

how do you explain the baby booms at some companies?

and here I was thinking all this time it had to do with playing footsies under the table.  And now you're telling me it's in the water??

 

on Nov 08, 2011

The following article is WRITTEN by Chuck Norris entitled:

THE VENOM IN THE FEDS VACCINATIONS

 

 

Monday, November 07, 2011 1:10 PM

While most mainstream news covers presidential campaigns or economic conditions, the feds are going under the radar and your skin – literally – with something that could be detrimental to your children's and your health. And news just broke about the cover-up, but few, if any, agencies passed along the wire.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, or CDC, one in 110 children have autism spectrum disorders, or ASDs, which is strikingly higher than ratios just two decades ago. (ASDs are a group of developmental disabilities that can cause communication, behavioral and social challenges.) The National Autism Association, or NAA, calls the 644 percent increase of ASDs among all U.S. children since the early 1990s "a tragic epidemic of autism."

Many attribute the increase in numbers of ASDs to children being exposed to significant quantities of thimerosal, a mercury-based compound that has been used since the 1930s as a preservative in certain vaccines and pharmaceutical products to prevent bacterial and fungal contamination.

According to its own website, however, the CDC stands by its conclusions that, "To date, the studies continue to show that vaccines are not associated with ASDs" (emphasis on "CDC's" conclusions). CDC added, "The most recent and rigorous scientific research does not support the argument that thimerosal–containing vaccines are harmful. … Is thimerosal in vaccines safe? Yes."

But last week a PRNewswire release reported that the Coalition for Mercury-free Drugs, or CoMeD, exposed a federal cover-up between the CDC and vaccine researchers. Despite that the CDC possessed a 2002 communication that revealed a causal relationship between the removal of thimerosal from vaccines and a decline in autism rates, the CDC published a 2003 cornerstone article in Pediatrics that ignored the Danish data and misled the medical community and public by insinuating that thimerosal in vaccines does not increase the risks of autism.

Almost inconceivable, the Pediatrics article actually purported that autism rates increased after thimerosal was removed. And to add insult to injury, the PRNewswire report noted, "One coauthor, from Aarhus University, Denmark, was aware of the omission and alerted CDC officials in a 2002 email, stating, 'Attached I send you the short and long manuscript about Thimerosal and autism in Denmark … I need to tell you that the figures do not include the latest data from 2001 … but the incidence and prevalence are still decreasing in 2001.'"

The deliberate avoidance and falsification of scientific medical data to support CDC bias is heinous enough, but the fact that such information is manipulated to practice medicine on our nation's children is monstrous malpractice and even premeditated malevolence. I agree wholeheartedly with Lisa Sykes, president of CoMeD, on her summary of the CDC cover-up: "This type of malfeasance should not be tolerated by those who are entrusted with our children's health and well-being."

The Alliance for Natural Health commented that this is not the first shady behavior to be exposed in the CDC. ANH explained, "This is not the first scandal to hit the CDC in recent years. Earlier this year, Dr. Poul Thorsen, one of the co-authors of the Pediatrics article and "scientist-in-residence" at the CDC from 2000 to 2002, was indicted in Atlanta for fraud and money laundering in relation to his $11 million grant from the CDC. And just last week, Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, a top CDC official, was arrested and charged with two counts of child molestation and one count of bestiality."

And just when you think vaccination news couldn't get any worse, last week the San Francisco Chronicle reported that the National Biodefense Science Board, which advises the federal government on bioterrorism issues, voted 12-1 to recommend that the Health and Human Services Department endorse and sponsor a study to test the anthrax vaccine in children! (Do these advisory panels not think 36 federally recommended vaccinations for children by age two are enough to add anthrax to them?)

To regress, the latest correlation revelation between vaccines and autism will fly in the face (or at least may cause some confusion) because of a 2011 August report from the Institute of Medicine, the nation's bastion of authoritative health and medicine advice, just cleared children vaccines as autism culprits.

But the truth is, as the NAA reports, "There are over 1,500 studies and papers documenting the hypoallergenicity and toxicity of thimerosal (ethylmercury) have existed for decades," with most recent research revealing commonness of speech delays and tics. The NAA added, "Recent studies have confirmed the association between the use of thimerosal and autism has moved from 'biologically plausible' [in 2001] to a 'biological certainty.'"

Hence, justification for thimerosal's inclusion in any product is unwarranted at best and dangerous at worst. Or, as the NAA categorically states in its series of warnings about thimerosal, "Mercury is hazardous to humans. The use of a toxic poison as a preservative is undesirable, unnecessary and should be eliminated entirely."

That is why the United Nations Environmental Programme is proposing a global treaty ban on mercury in vaccines, something SafeMinds.org, the parental advocacy group, applauds based upon its longevity in trumpeting the dangers and links of thimerosal.

But the facts are, according to a recent PRNewswire report, despite that thimerosal is not used in vaccines for measles, mumps, oral polio, yellow fever or tuberculosis, it is still found in in many diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and influenza (or flu) vaccines, especially in Third-World countries.

Since 2001 in the U.S., no new vaccine licensed by the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, for use in children has contained thimerosal (except influenza). Nevertheless, the CDC continues to recommend some routine vaccines for children younger than 6 years of age with "trace amounts of thimerosal."

The FDA has approved many seasonal flu vaccines, which come in both multi-dose vials and single-dose units. Those that are produced in large quantities and are in multi-dose vials contain thimerosal, while the single-dose units (including nasal spray) do not contain thimerosal because they are opened immediately and used only once. (So if you or yours insist on seasonal influenza shots, ensure it is a single dose.)

But do we really want to swap the flu bug for thimerosal? And isn't "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention" a total misnomer when it allows "trace amounts of thimerosal" in our children's soup of medicines? Are we really going to allow our children to be mercury-laced vaccinated guinea pigs? At the very least, shouldn't we avoid all thimerosal-containing products solely because of precautionary measures?

Dr. Jose Dorea, professor of nutritional sciences from the Universidad de Brasilia, hit the health nail right on the head when he recently said, "The evidence continues to mount that mercury in vaccines is not safe, that negative effects happen even with vaccine levels of exposure. We must end the use of thimerosal as soon as possible. No pregnant mother or child should have to trade getting mercury injected into them for the prevention of an infectious disease."

So buyer, beware! Or should I say, booster, beware! Don't check your brain in at the door of your family's health, nutrition or medical care. And don't ever be afraid to ask the hard questions of your health practitioners, like, "What are the exact ingredients in that syringe?"

It is your health, and they are your children, entrusted to you by God, so be bold in ensuring their safety and welfare. You still have the constitutional right to refuse any health care you deem unnecessary.

 

on Nov 09, 2011

this is what Bobby, my son, had to say about what you just sent when I sent it to him:

 

"This gets old after a while. Some people will always believe that there are aliens at area 51. Others think vaccines cause autism. Too bad the scientific literature doesn't seem to support the idea, unless you believe in conspiracy theories like this."

on Nov 10, 2011

lulapilgrim
So buyer, beware! Or should I say, booster, beware! Don't check your brain in at the door of your family's health, nutrition or medical care. And don't ever be afraid to ask the hard questions of your health practitioners, like, "What are the exact ingredients in that syringe?"

It is your health, and they are your children, entrusted to you by God, so be bold in ensuring their safety and welfare. You still have the constitutional right to refuse any health care you deem unnecessary.

 

Your son may think as he likes. I think it's wise to be concerned about these things and not cast them off as "conspiracy theories". The fellow who cuts our lawn has a son who is suffering from autism.  He said his son was as normal as could be up until he got multiple vaccination shots. He rues that day. 

36 recommended vaccines by age 2 is something for parents to seriously think about. 

Medical science and technology has come a long way. What we didn't know then, we know now and are in the process of learning more. 

Now, through medical science we know that birth control pills cause breast cancer in some women. It's not good or helpful to imagine it's a conspiracy theory.  

So, ya, when it comes to vaccines and babies, you bet...buyer beware. 

 

 

on Nov 11, 2011

There's no arguing with people who believe this stuff. I'm not sure what "medical science" you're talking about, because I don't know any scientist who believe in this. There is no credible report of a relationship between vaccines and autism in the scientific literature. The only paper that described such a link turned out to be a fraud and got a lot of publicity when it was retracted this summer.

 

My son also sent this:

This article describes pretty well what the scientific/medical community thinks of the anti-vaccine people: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22003097

 

I pulled this out about the "vaccine critics":  ...developed an alternate world of internally legitimating studies, blogs, conferences, publications, and spokespeople to affirm a connection. 

 

 

on Nov 12, 2011

lulapilgrim
I think it's wise to be concerned about these things and not cast them off as "conspiracy theories". The fellow who cuts our lawn has a son who is suffering from autism.  He said his son was as normal as could be up until he got multiple vaccination shots. He rues that day. 

KFC Kickin For Christ
I pulled this out about the "vaccine critics":  ...developed an alternate world of internally legitimating studies, blogs, conferences, publications, and spokespeople to affirm a connection. 

As I said, my lawn guy would be one of those "vaccine critics" who affirms a connection. Unfortunately, he's not the only parent who's child was born normal in every way until after having these vaccines...and then was diagnosed with autism. 

 

 

on Nov 12, 2011

lulapilgrim
Unfortunately, he's not the only parent who's child was born normal in every way until after having these vaccines...and then was diagnosed with autism.

You can have your own opinion but you can't have your own facts.  There is no, repeat NO, relationship between any vaccine, or any combination of vaccines, and autism.

on Nov 12, 2011

exactly Daiwa.  Well said.  

Lula, this is just another running on emotion, heresay, opinion and scare tactics.  When all is said and done, there are no facts to substantiate their claims.   We need more than just your "lawn guy" believing it to be true.  

I know many people who believe a lot of things to be true.  I hear stuff all the time and just shake my head at all the "beliefs" out there.  They're sincere, but in the end, sincerely wrong.   Today, everything is based on feeling, not facts.  It's the new modern way, don't ya know?   

In the end, as always, truth always rises to the top.  So, if you're right and the medical/scientific experts are wrong it will surface.  But right now no connection can be found.   So now you have a choice to believe your "lawn guy" or those who have tested the crap out of this issue and cannot find any link.  

Feeling or fact?  Which will you go on?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

on Nov 15, 2011

You can have your own opinion but you can't have your own facts.  There is no, repeat NO, relationship between any vaccine, or any combination of vaccines, and autism.

 

 

lulapilgrim
But last week a PRNewswire release reported that the Coalition for Mercury-free Drugs, or CoMeD, exposed a federal cover-up between the CDC and vaccine researchers. Despite that the CDC possessed a 2002 communication that revealed a causal relationship between the removal of thimerosal from vaccines and a decline in autism rates, the CDC published a 2003 cornerstone article in Pediatrics that ignored the Danish data and misled the medical community and public by insinuating that thimerosal in vaccines does not increase the risks of autism.

"...Exposed a federal coverup.." Opinion or fact? That's why I agree,  Buyer Beware. 

"...CDC possessed a 2002 communication that revealed a casual relationship between the removal of thimerosal from vaccines and a decline in autism rates"   Opinion or fact? That's why I agree,  Buyer Beware. 

lulapilgrim
The deliberate avoidance and falsification of scientific medical data to support CDC bias is heinous enough, but the fact that such information is manipulated to practice medicine on our nation's children is monstrous malpractice and even premeditated malevolence.

 "...Such info is manipulated.." Opinion or fact? That's why I agree,  Buyer Beware. 

lulapilgrim
But do we really want to swap the flu bug for thimerosal? And isn't "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention" a total misnomer when it allows "trace amounts of thimerosal" in our children's soup of medicines? Are we really going to allow our children to be mercury-laced vaccinated guinea pigs? At the very least, shouldn't we avoid all thimerosal-containing products solely because of precautionary measures?

IMHO, the answer to the first question is no. So buyer beware.

Re: Last question...We'll just have to agree to disagree. 

KFC Kickin For Christ
There is no credible report of a relationship between vaccines and autism in the scientific literature. The only paper that described such a link turned out to be a fraud and got a lot of publicity when it was retracted this summer.

 

KFC Kickin For Christ
this is just another running on emotion, heresay, opinion and scare tactics.

 

lulapilgrim
the CDC published a 2003 cornerstone article in Pediatrics that ignored the Danish data and misled the medical community and public by insinuating that thimerosal in vaccines does not increase the risks of autism.

Yet, this latest news article on the topic has it that:

 

.."the Coalition for Mercury Free Drugs exposed a federal cover-up between the CDC and vaccine researchers..."   Fact of opinion? Running on emotion? Heresay? Scare tactics? 

We'll have to agree to disagree. 

 

KFC Kickin For Christ
But right now no connection can be found.   So now you have a choice to believe your "lawn guy" or those who have tested the crap out of this issue and cannot find any link.  

This latest news article indicates the Danes found the link (data) but there was a federal cover-up.

It's not about me being right or feelings. It's truly about let the buyer beware before they bring their child in for these vaccines.  

 

on Nov 16, 2011

and what would be the motive for a federal cover-up?  It's just another conspiracy theory out there.  

Would you like to see all these diseases come back that we've all but eradicated?  You want to see whooping cough/TB/measles... etc make a comeback?   Do you not know how sick children were BEFORE these vaccines came on the scene?  

lulapilgrim
It's truly about let the buyer beware before they bring their child in for these vaccines.  

and this I will agree with.  We should always do our HW before taking anybody's word for granted but not limited to just our physical well being..  if you get my drift!   

It's funny people wouldn't go to Jack Korvorkian as a family doctor, or to Bernie Madoff as a financial adviser, but yet they give no thought really, to who they trust their spiritual lives to swallowing everything, hook, line and sinker. 

 

 

 

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