Everyone is anxiously awaiting the news
Published on August 20, 2008 By KFC Kickin For Christ In Politics

I am axiously awaiting the naming of the VP positions especially for McCain.  There still could be a chance I'm not going to the polls this year.   Hopefully this won't happen but alot hinges on the VP choice McCain makes.

During this past weekend's Q&A with Rick Warren of the Saddleback church John McCain answered very simply to the "when does life begin"  question.  He came right out and said life begins with conception. 

Obama, on the other hand, gave this long convoluted answer which in my book was really a  "I don't know" answer.  But then again, Obama has extreme pro-abort ideas and he's sticking by that pro-choice position. I like Ronald Reagan's stance on this issue.  If we don't really "know" and there is much debate on this "when does life begin" issue shouldn't we NOT abort and err on the side of life?  He said we don't bury a "seemingly" dead person until we first make darn sure he's dead first.  So why kill a human being if we're undecided on when he becomes human first? 

There has been some talk about McCain choosing a pro-abortion VP.  I guess what he'd be saying, by doing so, is that abortion is not that big of an issue and if his VP is a pro-abort guy than so be it. 

I would have a problem with that.  

Because if McCain really believed that life begins at conception, he'd do all he can do to protect unborn life and picking a VP who is ok with murdering babies in the womb, in my book, is hyprocrisy.  How can two walk together if they can't agree on the most basic of all basic things? 

At least, Obama is upfront with his belief even if, in my book, he doesn't have a clue about many things including the abortion matter.   He's not being hypocritical but only relaying what he believes to be true,  At least Obama (and I cringe when I say this) is sticking to his beliefs and is honest with us on this issue. 

Somebody told me this week that if McCain picks a pro-abort VP then he will vote for Obama even though he strongly disagrees with him.  His reasoning would be if McCain goes against what he believes  (or says what he believes) by picking a pro-abortion VP  then he deserves to lose.   I'm not sure why McCain would go against his own belief and that of  the majority of the party that supports him.  To me it would be political suicide.

I know one thing.  I will NOT vote for Obama for any reason.  If anything a  NO vote for McCain is a vote for Obama anyhow. 

We will know soon enough. 

What do you think? 

 

 

 

 

 


Comments (Page 1)
on Aug 20, 2008

Because if McCain really believed that life begins at conception, he'd do all he can do to protect unborn life and picking a VP who is ok with murdering babies in the womb, in my book, is hyprocrisy. How can two walk together if they can't agree on the most basic of all basic things?

See, I agree with you on the issue, but I am not using it as a litmus test.  Why?  The next president (or the one after that) is not going to change things.  Even if the pope was elected, it would not change things.  So I understand when McCain indicates it is not a big issue.  It is not if you are looking for what he will do, versus say.

on Aug 20, 2008

I'm not so sure things wouldn't be changed.   We can't be sure. 

Last year, Senator Obama told the Planned Parenthood Action Fund that he supported another proposed law called the Freedom of Choice Act. That legislation would overturn all current restrictions on abortion, including the federal ban on partial-birth abortions and all state restrictions, such as parental notification laws and waiting periods. It would also force taxpayers to pay for any abortion that a woman couldnt afford on her own.

And with a democratic congress it's as good as done. 

Also McCain is 72 years old.  If anything happens to him, his VP is going to be very important.  Already there is some talk that there may be one or two Supreme Court Judges who will step down and that the next President will be weighing in on this decision. 

 

on Aug 20, 2008

I'm not going to get into the whole abortion issue other than to say that I completely disagree with you, but based on the arguments that we have had on other threads that shouldn't be much of a surprise.

What I will say is that no matter what the VP choice is please vote.  Unless you live in a state that doesn't allow third party candidates onto the ballot (Texas is one that makes it extremely difficult, if not impossible) then you can at least consider a third party candidate if you don't like McCain.  Hell if you don't like who McCain choses you can write in Donal Duck as a protest vote, just please whatever happens please vote.  The only way anything is going to change in the way this government runs things is if it starts to realize that the people are paying attention and exercising their right to vote people into or out of office.  The only way to really do that is to increase voter turn out, so if you stay home on election night you are essentially telling the government: "Go ahead and do whatever you want" and from your post here that is the opposite of your position.

on Aug 20, 2008

Vote Nader in '08!

Actually, I hope McCain picks Huckabee, since that's an unelectable ticket.  And I don't want that old codger (who's bound to keel over like the old, tired family dog anyway during his term) to be president.

Of course, I don't want Obama to be, either . . .

on Aug 20, 2008

I am axiously awaiting the naming of the VP positions especially for McCain.

Me too!

There has been some talk about McCain choosing a pro-abortion VP. I guess what he'd be saying, by doing so, is that abortion is not that big of an issue and if his VP is a pro-abort guy than so be it. I would have a problem with that.

Me too!

Because if McCain really believed that life begins at conception, he'd do all he can do to protect unborn life and picking a VP who is ok with murdering babies in the womb, in my book, is hyprocrisy.

Same here!

How can two walk together if they can't agree on the most basic of all basic things?

 That's the point, they can't. That's why in key social issues such as abortion is, the VP should be in the same lineup as the President is.

I'm not sure why McCain would go against his own belief and that of the majority of the party that supports him. To me it would be political suicide.

If McCain chooses a pro-abort VP, it will undoubtedly be for some political gain that he thinks or is told would be of more value than the pro-life vote.  You are right that choosing a pro-abort VP woulld be political suicide. Surely, if we can figure it out, and if he is a serious pro-life candidate, then he surely knows this as well.

The GOP platform is pro-life so why would he go against that?   It doesn't make sense that he would.

I know one thing. I will NOT vote for Obama for any reason.

I agree. And I know something else....that I will not vote for McCain if he has a pro-abortion VP. Period.

I am so sick and tired of Republicans, the supposed pro-life party, aiding and abetting the furthering the killling of innocents in the womb. It's got to stop...that begins with me and my one vote.

What do you think?

I think your thoughts of the VP choice are pretty much my thoughts on the VP choice. Thanks for the good article, KFC.     

on Aug 20, 2008

I wish the issue of abortion was not involved in the presidential process.  Regardless of one's views, I feel that it's an issue that should be deciced by "the people" and not the president or the supreme court.  It shouldn't matter what the President believes about abortion.  It should matter if the President will abide by the will of the people on what *they* believe about abortion.  It is for us "the people" to decide what is right and persuade others to a concensus, not those in Washington that are to serve us.

As for McCain picking Lieberman or Ridge, I don't believe that it's important for a Vice President to be a mirror to the President's candle.  Only poor leaders surround themselves with yes men and those who do not challange their own beliefs.

on Aug 20, 2008

I don't believe in a one issue vote.  I understand you feel stongly about this issue.  I still think you have to look at the big picture and not choose one candidate over another because his VP choice believes a certain way on ONE issue.  The point may be moot anyway because the articles I have read said that McCain is NOT going to choose a pro-choice VP. 

on Aug 20, 2008

then you can at least consider a third party candidate if you don't like McCain. Hell if you don't like who McCain choses you can write in Donal Duck as a protest vote, just please whatever happens please vote. The only way anything is going to change in the way this government runs things is if it starts to realize that the people are paying attention and exercising their right to vote people into or out of office. The only way to really do that is to increase voter turn out, so if you stay home on election night you are essentially telling the government: "Go ahead and do whatever you want" and from your post here that is the opposite of your position.

I agree with your encouragement to go and vote, El-Duderino. I'll vote for a third party only if he's pro-life though. I'm a one issue voter. I'll go to the polls becasue there are usually other elections and referendum questions on the ballot.

  

on Aug 20, 2008

I want John McCain to pick Joe Lieberman as VP.

I like Joe Lieberman, I support most of his positions, and I like his style.  He is not acceptable for liberals, of course; but ironically he is a total minority representative (Jew, religious, man).

Finally a McCain/Lieberman ticket would truly unite Republicans and Democrats, that is moderates of each side.

And both are fairly old which means that Hillary can become president after them. After McCain a Democrat WILL win, I am sure, and I actually liked Clinton and didn't like that Obama and the Democrats have done to Hillary this year.

 

on Aug 20, 2008

I'm a one issue voter.

Then you're essentially a useless voter, putting everything on one pony like that.

Perhaps it's best you don't, then.

on Aug 20, 2008

I agree with your encouragement to go and vote, El-Duderino. I'll vote for a third party only if he's pro-life though. I'm a one issue voter. I'll go to the polls becasue there are usually other elections and referendum questions on the ballot.

The two big third party candidates that are pro-life are Bob Barr (libertarian) and Chuck Baldwin (constitution?).  The hard part is getting them on your states ballot.  Bob Barr didn't get enough signatures to get onto my states ballot yet somehow Cynthia McKinney did, go figure.

on Aug 20, 2008

Finally a McCain/Lieberman ticket would truly unite Republicans and Democrats, that is moderates of each side.

I'm going to have to disagree with you there.  I don't think a McCain/Lieberman ticket would do anything but divide people.  For one thing if he chose Lieberman he would alienate his base more than he as a politician already does.  The conservative base is already on shaky ground when it comes to McCain, picking a "Democrat" would send them running for any other conservative they could get their hands on (Bob Barr or Chuck Baldwin primarily).  I just don't think a McCain/Lieberman ticket would have any chance of winning in Nov.

 

Then you're essentially a useless voter, putting everything on one pony like that.

I wouldn't say useless, every vote serves a purpose, I would say that one issue voters are missing the point most of the time though.  It's fine if they want to focus on one issue but they have to deal with the consequences of such an action since doing so can mean you get someone in office that does everything you hate except for that one issue.

on Aug 20, 2008

GENGHIS HANK POSTS:

I wish the issue of abortion was not involved in the presidential process.

Me too.

It wasn't until the 1973 US Supreme Court decided to make the barbarism of "abortion on demand", anytime, for anyone, for any reason,  the law of the land. Now, it's so prevalent, it's birth control.

That's what we have to deal with.

It shouldn't matter what the President believes about abortion.

It shouldn't, however,  it's critical now since it's the President that nominates all the federal judges.

 

 

on Aug 20, 2008

It wasn't until the 1973 US Supreme Court decided to make the barbarism of "abortion on demand", anytime, for anyone, for any reason, the law of the land. Now, it's so prevalent, it's birth control.

I have been trying to stay out of the abortion debate as it is a rather touchy subject for me but I can't any longer, I will however try to hold back a little.

Abortion is a necessary evil.  Yes abortion is not pleasent and anyone who thinks it is an easy decision for a woman to make is fooling themselves, but it is necessary.  In cases of rape and incest it is essential.  In cases where the woman's health is at risk it is essential.  And because it is essential in those cases it needs to be safe and legal in all cases so that there are enough doctors around to do the procedure on those women that need it.

Are there women out there who abuse abortion and use it as a primary form of birth control, probably, and it shouldn't be used as a primary form of birth control, but that is no argument for getting rid of abortion all together because of the reasons I listed above.  Maybe it could use some more regulation but that starts you down a very slippery slope where you are drawing very fine lines between reasonable regulation and infringing on what should be rights.

I am going to attempt to leave my comments on the subject at this but we'll see if it holds.

on Aug 20, 2008

I don't think a McCain/Lieberman ticket would do anything but divide people. For one thing if he chose Lieberman he would alienate his base more than he as a politician already does. The conservative base is already on shaky ground when it comes to McCain, picking a "Democrat" would send them running for any other conservative they could get their hands on (Bob Barr or Chuck Baldwin primarily). I just don't think a McCain/Lieberman ticket would have any chance of winning in Nov.

I absolutely agree with you on this one El-D.  For one thing you've been reading my mind.  I'm thinking (and really have right along) that if McCain picks a pro-abort VP that I would vote for Baldwin.  All along I don't usually like to do this (and never have), because I know he's a spoiler but when you feel like you don't have a choice, it's a way to voice it I suppose. 

Abortion is a necessary evil

now, of course this I strongly disagree on.  In fact, if you dig just a little, you'd find that the abortion decision made in 1973 was all founded on lies.  And continues to operate this way.  I strongly recommend reading "Won By Love" by Norma McCorvey on exactly what happened back then and subsequent to the infamous decision of 1973.  Then go back a few weeks ago and see if you can drum up the news that quietly went unnoticed about a report by Bernard Nathanson (a hero to the movement back then) who commented on the many lies that had to be told to get abortion legalized. 

We were tricked basically. 

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